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Published on 17 March 2014 Global
They chose 36 amphibians and reptiles endemic to the United States. Reptiles and amphibians almost everywhere seem to be vulnerable for a mix of reasons: among them habitat destruction, environmental pollution and the introduction of new predators and new diseases. The more exquisite the ecological niche occupied by the species, the smaller its overall population and the more precarious its chances of survival. The researchers…
Published on 17 March 2014
Srinivasan is one of a growing number of scientists, politicians and public figures around the world who are trying to draw attention the adverse effects of climate change on the environment. Both U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and British Foreign Secretary David King gave speeches in Jakarta recently in a bid to raise awareness. Indonesia, with the world’s second longest coastline, is considered the…
Published on 17 March 2014
Singapore, which experiences tropical downpours on most days, suffered its longest dry spell on record between January 13 and February 8 and has had little rain since. In peninsular Malaysia, 15 areas have not had rainfall in more than 20 days, with some of them dry for more than a month, according to the Malaysian Meteorological Department. Forecasters say the dry spell is expected to…
Published on 17 March 2014 Philippines
Marikina City, which lies downstream of the UMRBPL, was one of the most severely hit LGUs by Typhoon Ondoy, which battered the city on September 26, 2009, killing scores of people and destroying property worth several hundred millions of pesos. The study was a component of the Asian Development Bank funded technical assistance, titled “Climate Resilience and Green Growth in the UMRBPL: Demonstrating the Eco-town…
Published on 24 February 2014
Research by the Universities of Exeter and Oxford looked at how effective community forestry is in reducing deforestation and supporting livelihoods in the Prey Long forest area of Cambodia. Prey Long forest is one of the last lowland evergreen forests of mainland Southeast Asia. Banteng – wild Cambodian cattle – roam the grassy clearings, and pangolin hide in the shadows. Prey Long is home to…
Published on 24 February 2014
Read the article here: https://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2014/01/25/Dont-blame-climate-change-for-cooler-weather/ Source: The Star Online | 25 January 2014
Published on 24 February 2014
Less than a week later, Typhoon Pepeng (international code name Parma) hit Northern Luzon, leaving a death toll of 500 with damages estimated at P27 billion ($ 594 million). Thailand was devastated by severe flooding when Tropical Storm Nock-ten hit the country in July 2011. The flood, which affected 64 of Thailand’s 77 provinces, killed 800 people, damaged more than 3 million homes, and inundated…
Published on 24 February 2014
Research by National Hydraulic Research Institute Malaysia (Nahrim) shows that changing climate patterns are making both dry spells and heavy storms more intense. Although Malaysia has abundant rainfall all year round, it is unevenly distributed, said Syarikat Bekalan Air Selangor (Syabas) technical development executive director V. Subramaniam. In a nutshell, it does not always rain in rivers that supply raw water to treatment plants…
Published on 24 February 2014
Climate change has become malignant. It threatens to blunt Asia's growth and upend our development. Climate scientists are increasingly certain that catastrophic weather events -- such as the 2011 floods in Thailand, one of history's costliest disasters, or last year's Typhoon Haiyan, which killed and displaced thousands of people in the Philippines -- will become more frequent and intense. From small island states to delta…
Published on 24 February 2014
He was speaking at the fourth Indonesia Climate Change Center (ICCC) Coffee Morning, themed “The UK Green Experience – Climate Change Act, Green Investment, Energy Reform” presented by Sir David King, the UK foreign secretary’s special representative for climate change. Rachmat said Indonesia could hopefully learn lessons from the UK’s experience in dealing with climate change impacts, such as the flooding currently affecting several regions…
Published on 24 February 2014
Data from the University of Maryland and Google shows that around 230 million hectares of forest – the equivalent of 50 soccer fields a minute – were lost between 2000 and 2012. On Thursday, the Washington D.C.-based World Resources Institute (WRI), in partnership with 40 other organizations, including Google and the University of Maryland, launched Global Forest Watch, an online forest monitoring and alert system…
Published on 24 February 2014
"Tree planting and preservation activities can help ensure food provision and ground water reserves," he told students gathered at the event. As part of the government's commitment to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 26 percent by 2020, Indonesia has pledged to plant billions of trees across the country. From 2010 to 2013, the country planted at least one billion trees under a tree-planting programme. The…
Published on 24 February 2014
Indonesia, as a developing country that will benefit from the flow of international climate finance, has shown great interest in the GCF and has continued to strive to ensure that its interests and those of other developing countries are properly represented. In fact, Indonesia has secured a seat on the GCF board, composed of an equal number of members from developing and developed countries, with…
Published on 24 February 2014 Global
The immediate answer is that the UK is “stuck” in a weather pattern – a common feature of our climate. But what is uncommon is the exceptional intensity of the rain and waves. There is a perfect so-called “storm factory” in the Atlantic caused by warm, moist air from the tropics coming up unusually close to the very cold polar air. The jet stream is…
Published on 24 February 2014 Global
Rummer added that many species in that region only experience a very narrow range of temperatures over their entire lives, and so are likely adapted to perform best at those temperatures. This means climate change places equatorial marine species most at risk, as oceans are projected to warm by two to three degrees Celsius by the end of the 21st century, researchers said in a…
Published on 24 February 2014 Philippines
“The installation of the said devices is in line with Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards). Most of the devices were installed in parts of the region mostly affected with bad weather condition,” Bartolome noted. Under the Preparedness Committee through the leadership of the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), various trainings on disaster risk reduction and management and disaster preparedness and…
Published on 24 February 2014 Feature
Research of land and sea surface temperature from 1960 and 2009 shows these changes are already taking place, with the CSIRO’s map highlighting that shifting climate conditions are most pronounced in central and eastern Australia, covering swathes of Queensland, as well as north-west Western Australia. Arrows on the maps show the flow of localised condition changes, with blue areas indicating areas of significant change and…
Published on 24 February 2014 Global
The good news, from the climate’s standpoint, is that while global demand for energy is continuing to grow, the growth is slowing. The bad news is that one energy giant predicts global carbon dioxide emissions will probably rise by almost a third in the next 20 years. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says greenhouse gas emissions need to peak by 2020 and then decline…
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