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Published on 24 February 2014 Feature
Research of land and sea surface temperature from 1960 and 2009 shows these changes are already taking place, with the CSIRO’s map highlighting that shifting climate conditions are most pronounced in central and eastern Australia, covering swathes of Queensland, as well as north-west Western Australia. Arrows on the maps show the flow of localised condition changes, with blue areas indicating areas of significant change and…
Published on 24 February 2014 Global
The good news, from the climate’s standpoint, is that while global demand for energy is continuing to grow, the growth is slowing. The bad news is that one energy giant predicts global carbon dioxide emissions will probably rise by almost a third in the next 20 years. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says greenhouse gas emissions need to peak by 2020 and then decline…
Published on 18 February 2014 Feature
1. More intense El Niño The El Niño phenomenon occurs when the surface of ocean waters in the southern Pacific becomes abnormally warm. The energy created by this warming is so great that it can create an imbalance in the weather in different parts of the world. In Southeast Asia, it can lead to abnormally dry conditions. El Niño can also make other weather events…
Published on 18 February 2014 Global
A new report by the Interim Forest Finance Project has called on the international community to inject US$12 billion to stimulate demand for the flagging global REDD+ initiative under the United Nations. The report, launched by Global Canopy Programme (GCP), the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM), Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and UNEP Finance Initiative on Friday, calls on governments, donor agencies and financial institutions…
Published on 18 February 2014 Malaysia
Reading about the floods in the east coast states of Malaysia and Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines clearly left us disheartened. A recent study by the Asian Development Bank shows that disaster losses have outpaced the region’s economic growth and will continue to threaten any development gains in the emerging markets. Governments, businesses and even individuals play an equal role in mitigating GHG emissions. In…
Published on 18 February 2014 Feature
The “frequency and severity of extreme weather events” brought about by climate change expose the vulnerabilities of a nation and its “preparedness” to deal with the consequences of global warming, Lim reported in “Under siege,” which introduced the special report series on Feb. 4. Educate Located along the Pacific Ocean, the country will always be besieged by calamities. There is still no way to predict…
Published on 18 February 2014 Feature
Energy use patterns and fossil fuels - a mounting problem The research project was aimed at performing analysis of likely future climate conditions, energy use patterns and how those energy deployment methods will impact the climate as it develops. According to the news source, the team found that as of 2010, coal, oil and gas still represented approximately 80 percent of energy use. Furthermore, if…
Published on 18 February 2014 Global
That number may sound small, but this visualization shows just how dramatically temperatures around the globe have changed: “Long-term trends in surface temperatures are unusual and 2013 adds to the evidence for ongoing climate change,” GISS climatologist Gavin Schmidt said in a press release. “While one year or one season can be affected by random weather events, this analysis shows the necessity for continued, long-term…
Published on 18 February 2014 Global
“This study changes the way we think about climate change vulnerability of plants and animals,” says study co-author Mary O’Connor, an assistant professor in the University of British Columbia’s Dept. of Zoology. “Until recently, we believed that tropical species were more at risk of extinction because generally they cannot tolerate increasing temperatures. We also thought that many plants and animals in colder climates like in…
Published on 18 February 2014 Global
So what exactly is geoengineering then, a concept given some unexpected attention and increasing legitimacy by its mention in the most recent IPCC report? It refers to methods that “aim to deliberately alter the climate system to counter climate change.” The rather controversial area of engineering Earth’s climate seems to now be firmly planted on the scientific agenda. Some climate models suggest that geoengineering may…
Published on 29 January 2014 Global
She said climate change was the most significant social issue the world was going to face and every student should have access to a sound, evidence-based material on the underlying science. ”Many teachers are already teaching climate change to younger students. But the rationale about getting it more explicitly in the curriculum is so that every teacher teaches it,” she said. Research and interviews carried…
Published on 29 January 2014 Global
Extreme weather from China’s coldest winter in at least half a century in 2010 to a July hailstorm in Reutlingen, Germany, already started to affect food prices. In the past three years, orange juice, corn, wheat, soybean meal and sugar were five of the top eight most volatile commodities, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Natural gas was first. “Significant damage and destruction is already…
Published on 28 January 2014 Global
The most powerful El Niños – such as the ones that developed in 1982-83 and 1997-98 – are forecast to occur once every 10 years throughout the rest of this century, according to study lead author Wenju Cai of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science agency. Over the past 100 years or so, however these “extreme” El Niños occurred only once…
Published on 28 January 2014 Global
The study, published online January 15, 2014, in the journal Ecology Letters, examined competitive dynamics among crustose coralline algae, a group of species living in the waters around Tatoosh Island, Washington. These species of algae grow skeletons made of calcium carbonate, much like other shelled organisms such as mussels and oysters. As the ocean absorbs more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the water becomes more…
Published on 28 January 2014 Philippines
"In fact, partial data show that in 2013, 74 percent of estimated damages of natural disasters in the country were in the agriculture sector," Balisacan said in his welcome remarks for the launch of an agriculture-related project on Monday in Metro Manila, the Philippines' capital region. Under the project, the Philippine government is partnering with international agencies CGIAR and the International Food Policy Research Institute…
Published on 28 January 2014 Myanmar
Dr. Lynn Thiesmeyer, vice-president of the Environmental and Economic Research Institute of Myanmar, says the sheer number of livelihoods left in tatters made a rebound difficult. “A major natural disaster on the scale of Cyclone Nargis could pose a threat to government legitimacy and reverse progress made toward democratisation.” Delta residents who lost farms to salinisation or lost a season’s crop with no money to…
Published on 28 January 2014 Global
The scientists report in Nature Climate Change that they worked their way through more than 1.2 million distribution records of 25 species of British butterfly at intervals over the past 40 years. Britain has a long history of systematic bird and butterfly observation and much information had been recorded by enthusiastic amateur natural historians, and the partners in the study were agencies such as Butterfly…
Published on 28 January 2014 Feature
1. Disaster response, rehabilitation and mitigation in the Philippines Post-typhoon recovery efforts in the Philippines will continue to concern aid groups in 2014 given the scale of the devastation and the assistance needed. The relief operations, dubbed the largest in the country since World War II, remain in its infancy and will need considerable time. Haiyan has steered global attention to the importance of disaster…
Published on 9 January 2014 Indonesia
The extended forest moratorium and the REDD+ Agency in particular are crucial to help realize the governments commitment to the reduction of CO2 emissions in Indonesia by 26 percent by 2020, and by 40 percent with international support. The commitment was announced by President Yudhoyono in October 2009 and received a positive response from the Government of Norway which later agreed to sign a Letter…
Published on 9 January 2014 Global
The team has also said that creatures living in the remotest regions of the ocean will also be affected by changes in the environment. Decrease in the number of marine organisms will directly hit fisheries, researchers added. For the study, the team used latest climate models to understand the changes in food supply in the future. They then looked at the relationship between food supply…
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