Welcome to SEARCA Knowledge Center on Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture and Natural Resource Management in Southeast Asia (KC3)

Harvested Publications

Genetic resources for food and agriculture play a crucial role in food security, nutrition, and livelihoods and in the provision of environmental services. They are key components of sustainability, resilience, and adaptability in production systems. They underpin the ability of crops, livestock, aquatic organisms, and forest trees to withstand a range of harsh conditions. Thanks to their genetic diversity plants, animals and micro-organisms adapt and survive when their environments change. Climate change poses new challenges to the management of the world’s genetic resources for food and agriculture,…
Growing conditions for agriculture are diverse in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), from the mountainous areas of Lao PDR and the Central Highlands in Vietnam to the lowland plains in the Mekong Delta. Farming systems range from traditional shifting agriculture systems dominated by upland rice through industrial plantations, including smallholder intensive rice farmers. Rainfed agriculture is the dominant type of agriculture in the LMB. Rainfed rice is the dominant crop, representing 75% of the agricultural area within the LMB. Other…
This review outlines existing knowledge (context-specific and localized) of climate change impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation, assesses the limitations of different frameworks and approaches used by various initiatives in Cambodia, and identifies knowledge gaps for future research. It explores the impacts of climate change on livelihoods through three dimensions: (1) agricultural practices, technology, policy, irrigation, credit and markets; (2) community-based natural resources management and the roles of forest, fishery and water-user communities in protecting and managing resources; and (3) gender considerations.…
The "Redraw The Line" climate change awareness campaign, the No Impact Project and the Asia-Pacific Media Alliance for Social Awareness are holding a series of one-day seminars around Asia on “Building Critical Mass Awareness of Climate Change - Engaging Media, Advertising and Entertainment Sectors”. The events aim to stimulate dialogue and cooperation between different sectors in addressing climate change. Objectives The events aim to stimulate dialogue and cooperation in mitigating and adapting to climate change through multi-sector partnerships between different…
The Approach The Centre for Climate Risk and Opportunity Management (CCROM) introduced a comprehensive approach for mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) and Climate Change Mitigation (CCM) within the framework of Water Resources Management at catchment level. It was piloted for the Citarum River watershed in West Java, Indonesia. Scope and entry points The core of the whole process is to integrate CCA and CCM options into catchment management and local development planning. In doing so, the approach supports a resilient…
The Method Vulnerability Assessment by the World Wildlife Fund – Indonesia (WWF-VA) is a rapid method to identify adaptation options for ecosystem-dependent communities, which are vulnerable to climate variability and change. It was piloted in Malemba and Mensiau, two villages between the Sentarum Lake National Park (Taman Nasional Danau Sentarum) and Betung Kerihun National Park (Taman Nasional Betung Kerihun) of West Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. The area is a migration corridor for orang-utans between the two national parks. Scope and entry…
What are Vulnerability Assessments? Vulnerability describes the degree to which a natural or social system is susceptible to, and unable to cope with, adverse effects of climate change, including climate variability and extremes (IPCC 2007). The purpose of assessing the underlying factors of vulnerability is to identify measures and policies that reduce vulnerability. Vulnerability Assessments (VAs) help to identify the nature and extent to which climate change may harm a country, region, sector or community. These assessments provide a basis…
What is mainstreaming adaptation to climate change? Climate change can endanger human health and life – either directly through disasters or by damaging the productivity of critical development resources such as crops and livestock, forest, fisheries, and water. To avoid this, we have to consider and anticipate climate change risks when deciding, e.g. where and how to build infrastructure, what crops to plant and when to plant them, what species to reforest, which health services to provide in the future,…
Adaptation monitoring and evaluation (M&E) assesses whether adaptation measures have achieved their desired results and whether resources have been used efficiently and effectively. M&E can ensure accountability, which is particularly important in the context of climate finance. In addition, adaptation M&E can also support project and programme management under uncertainty and facilitate learning about what does and does not work, and why. The learning aspect is particularly important as adaptation is still a relatively new policy field. The core question…
Why do we need climate information? ‘Adapt to what exactly?’ is the first question a decisionmaker may ask when faced with the need to prepare for the consequences of climate change. Without knowing the expected changes in climatic conditions, proactive and anticipatory adaptation approaches are difficult. We might identify no-regret measures that are suitable to different climate change scenarios, but the more we know, the better our responses can be. In a changing climate we, therefore, need usable climate information…
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