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Global

Published on 18 February 2014
That number may sound small, but this visualization shows just how dramatically temperatures around the globe have changed: “Long-term trends in surface temperatures are unusual and 2013 adds to the evidence for ongoing climate change,” GISS climatologist Gavin Schmidt said in a press release. “While one year or one season can be affected by random weather events, this analysis shows the necessity for continued, long-term…
Published on 18 February 2014
“This study changes the way we think about climate change vulnerability of plants and animals,” says study co-author Mary O’Connor, an assistant professor in the University of British Columbia’s Dept. of Zoology. “Until recently, we believed that tropical species were more at risk of extinction because generally they cannot tolerate increasing temperatures. We also thought that many plants and animals in colder climates like in…
Published on 18 February 2014
So what exactly is geoengineering then, a concept given some unexpected attention and increasing legitimacy by its mention in the most recent IPCC report? It refers to methods that “aim to deliberately alter the climate system to counter climate change.” The rather controversial area of engineering Earth’s climate seems to now be firmly planted on the scientific agenda. Some climate models suggest that geoengineering may…
Published on 29 January 2014
She said climate change was the most significant social issue the world was going to face and every student should have access to a sound, evidence-based material on the underlying science. ”Many teachers are already teaching climate change to younger students. But the rationale about getting it more explicitly in the curriculum is so that every teacher teaches it,” she said. Research and interviews carried…
Published on 29 January 2014
Extreme weather from China’s coldest winter in at least half a century in 2010 to a July hailstorm in Reutlingen, Germany, already started to affect food prices. In the past three years, orange juice, corn, wheat, soybean meal and sugar were five of the top eight most volatile commodities, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Natural gas was first. “Significant damage and destruction is already…
Published on 28 January 2014
The most powerful El Niños – such as the ones that developed in 1982-83 and 1997-98 – are forecast to occur once every 10 years throughout the rest of this century, according to study lead author Wenju Cai of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia’s national science agency. Over the past 100 years or so, however these “extreme” El Niños occurred only once…
Published on 28 January 2014
The study, published online January 15, 2014, in the journal Ecology Letters, examined competitive dynamics among crustose coralline algae, a group of species living in the waters around Tatoosh Island, Washington. These species of algae grow skeletons made of calcium carbonate, much like other shelled organisms such as mussels and oysters. As the ocean absorbs more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, the water becomes more…
Published on 28 January 2014
The scientists report in Nature Climate Change that they worked their way through more than 1.2 million distribution records of 25 species of British butterfly at intervals over the past 40 years. Britain has a long history of systematic bird and butterfly observation and much information had been recorded by enthusiastic amateur natural historians, and the partners in the study were agencies such as Butterfly…
Published on 9 January 2014
The team has also said that creatures living in the remotest regions of the ocean will also be affected by changes in the environment. Decrease in the number of marine organisms will directly hit fisheries, researchers added. For the study, the team used latest climate models to understand the changes in food supply in the future. They then looked at the relationship between food supply…
Published on 9 January 2014
Many of the world’s great cities are on low-lying coastal plains, or on river estuaries, and are therefore anyway at risk as sea levels rise because of global warming. But human action too – by damming rivers, by extracting ground water and by building massive structures on sedimentary soils – has accelerated coastal subsidence. Add to this the possibility of more intense tropical cyclones as…
Published on 9 January 2014
And if the world reacts, stops burning fossil fuel, and invests in green energy, then your chances of being killed by a wind turbine become just so much higher. Holger Goerlitz, of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, and colleagues report in the Proceedings of the Royal Society Interface that they looked at the challenge faced by bats that hunt with ultrasound…
Published on 9 January 2014
The team's work, which has been supported through funding from the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), is published by leading international journal Global Change Biology today (Friday, October 18), in a paper entitled 'Multi-decadal range changes versus thermal adaptation for north east Atlantic oceanic copepods in the face of climate change'. The paper's lead author Stephanie Hinder, a PhD student in Swansea University's Department of…
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