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Delegates arrive at the convention center during the COP 23 Fiji UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany (Nov. 6, 2017). Image Credit: AP Photo/Martin Meissner

When Fiji’s Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama assumed the presidency of the 23rd meeting of the UN’s climate change convention on November 6, he was a long way from his Pacific home. Fiji is the first Pacific Island country to host a UN Conference of the Parties (COP), but is doing so remotely from Bonn, Germany.

With a population of less than one million people, Fiji has taken on an outsized role at the United Nations in recent years, becoming a much more prominent leader on climate change than many much larger countries.

Despite being held in a cold German city, COP 23 will have many Fijian touches. Fiji will lead a dialogue following the Pacific principles of “Talanoa” – sharing stories to build empathy and trust. Bainimarama also plans to delegate formal proceedings so that he can play “a roving role” and be on hand “to resolve any difficulties in the formal negotiations.”

Read more: Can Fiji Save the World?

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Jakarta. Indonesia's Peatlands Restoration Agency, or BRG, on Tuesday (07/11) showcased the progress it has made in restoring the country's peatlands at the 23rd session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, or UNFCCC COP 23, in Bonn, Germany.

Read more: Indonesia Shows Off Progress in Peatland Restoration at UN Climate Change Summit

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A satellite image showing deforestation in Malaysian Borneo to allow the plantation of oil palm. Photo: NASA via Wikimedia Commons

Too much Halloween candy is a recipe for a stomachache. It’s also part of the recipe for climate change.

Most candy, along with many snack foods and other products like soap and makeup, contains palm oil.

Read more: A common ingredient in Halloween candy is contributing to climate change

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November 8 marks the fourth anniversary of Haiyan’s landfall in the Philippines. The super typhoon was the strongest ever to make landfall.

Today, the world continues to be devastated by even more extreme weather events. This year alone saw flooding in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Vietnam, and the United States; drought in Somalia; Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in the Caribbean and the U.S.; and just last week, Storm Herwart in Germany, Czech Republic, and Poland.

Read more: Fighting the Creeping Catastrophe of Climate Change

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A man walks through a muddy road after a flood in George Town, Penang, Malaysia November 6, 2017. Source: Reuters

Malaysian authorities are taking steps to help the thousands of people in its northeastern states of Penang and Kedah who have been hit by one of the worst floods in its history, Natural Resources and Environment Minister Wan Junaidi Jaafar says today, adding that climate change is one of the causes for the abnormal downpour.

At least seven have been reported dead and thousands have been affected by floods that have submerged cars, damaged buildings and uprooted trees last weekend. Heavy monsoon rains exacerbated by the effects of climate change have caused water levels to rise up to 2.7m, the minister said.

Read more: Malaysia: Climate change behind Penang’s devastating floods

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Copyright: Panos

  • Climate finance not working to save forests or their indigenous custodians

  • Investment in agriculture and development outstrips that for forest protection

  • Upholding indigenous people’s rights is the most effective way to healthy forest 

[LONDON] Climate finance, while efficient in sectors such as renewable energy, is not effective in protecting increasingly threatened forests or the rights of their inhabitants, a new report shows.

Read more: Climate finance failing on forest protection

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By: Arlina Arshad, The Strait Times

Just a decade ago, Kendari was among the filthiest cities in Indonesia. Bins overflowed with bags ofmouldy rice, rotting food scraps and plastic bottles. Reeking garbage was burned or left uncollected on the streets for weeks, attracting flies and roaches.

But today, the city of half a million people in south-east Sulawesi province has been spectacularly transformed, winning national cleanliness awards for eight straight years.

Read more: When waste isn’t wasted: How a small Indonesian city turned garbage into electricity

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That’s not java jive: shifting weather patterns mean the industry faces major upheaval within a generation, even as demand explodes.

Read more: The coffee industry is getting roasted by climate change

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The sunny island nation is harnessing the power of the sun to charge the development of its clean energy industry. In the run up to the Asia Clean Energy Summit in October 2017, Eco-Business looks back at the evolution of Singapore’s solar sector over the last decade.

The sunrise over Singapore's highly urbanised landscape. Can one of the world's most densely populated countries harvest solar energy from building facades? Image: Bo Nielsen, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Read more: Singapore’s 10-year journey in urban solar

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Along with taking lives and causing millions of dollars in property damage, the wildfires in California this week are scorching the land in another way: Millions of trees are being destroyed. The blazes have charred more than 770,000 acres in the state alone, as fires around the country seemingly grow more destructive by the year. 

Yet even that eye-opening number is a fraction of the devastation happening globally. The planet loses billions of trees every year due to a range of factors, including fire, illegal logging and clearance for agriculture.

"Trees are being lost at the rate of about a football field a second," said David Skole, professor of forestry at Michigan State University. "If you're watching the Michigan Wolverines play Michigan State and they go into overtime, every time the clock ticks down, a forest the size of that field disappears."  

A swath of burning forest is seen during "Operation Green Wave" conducted by agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources to combat illegal logging in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, August 4, 2017. BRUNO KELLY / REUTERS

Read more: This company wants to regrow Earth's forests with drones

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