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Climate Change News

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A leading DFID-funded programme called Action on Climate Today (ACT), has released a new paper ‘Mainstreaming, accessing and institutionalizing finance for climate change adaptation’. 

Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to adaptation action, and ACT’s framework helps governments to identify, track and measure climate adaptation finance through their budgets. This is the first of a series of reports based on ACT’s work in South Asia.

New framework ensures effective government financing for climate adaptation

  • The cost of climate change adaptation in South Asia could be as much as US$500 billion per year by 20501. Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to climate adaptation action. However, few countries have successfully accounted for public spending on climate adaptation.
  • A new framework that makes sure government spending on adaptation is effective, has been successfully tested in South Asia.
  • The new framework - Financing Framework for Resilient Growth (FFRG) – can help countries integrate climate change adaptation into their plans, policies, and budgets at the national and subnational level.
  • This framework helps governments identify climate spending for adaptation issues, track it through departmental budgets, understand the scale of need for new funding, and plan for and access new sources of climate finance.
  • The Action on Climate Today (ACT) programme has applied the FFRG in four South Asian countries: Afghanistan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan.

Read more: New framework helps governments meet climate spending goals

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Lat Phrao Canal Housing in Bangkok, Thailand

From 1990 to 2010, Southeast Asia was the fastest growing carbon emitter in the world, according to the Asia Development Bank. Although its historical share of global greenhouse gas emissions – primarily carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide –  is not as large, the region is on a trajectory that will make it a significant emitter in the future.

Read more: How Architecture Is Tackling Increasing Floods From Climate Change

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Bangkok

Thailand seems likely to emerge as a model of green building in Asia, a region that is urbanizing more rapidly than any other in the world. Last month, the country took a significant step by submitting two Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change: greening Thailand’s low- and middle-income housing, and greening the country’s government buildings.

Read more: Building for green growth in Thailand

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(File pix) Mangrove forests provide multiple ecosystem services and benefits to humans and nature. Their full functions and roles are still way beyond our understanding.

No matter how sturdy they seem to be, or how eerie they may appear, mangrove forests deserve vigilant attention and tender loving care.

Read more: On our love affair with Malaysian mangroves

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Our food – from what we eat to how it is grown – accounts for more carbon emissions than transport and yet staple crops will be hit hard by global warming.

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Did you know that what’s on your plate plays a larger role in contributing to climate change than the car you drive? When most wealthy people think about their carbon footprint or their contributions to climate change, they’ll think about where their electricity and heat come from or what they drive. They’ll think about fossil fuels and miles per gallon, about LED lights and mass transit – but not so much about combine harvesters or processed meals or food waste. Few consider the impacts of the food they eat, despite the fact that globally, food systems account for roughly one quarter of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions. That’s more than the entire transportation sector, more than all industrial practices, and roughly the same as the production of electricity and heat.

Read more: Why what we eat is crucial to the climate change question

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The Asian Development Bank (ADB) said on Friday it has secured 190 million U.S. dollars in total funding from the Green Climate Fund (GCF) for its climate change projects in Cambodia, Mongolia, and Tajikistan, shoring up the bank's efforts to increase its climate financing for the Asia and Pacific region.

Read more: ADB projects in Cambodia, Mongolia, Tajikistan get "green" funding

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Cambodia's forests are being felled at a shocking rate, as poachers and corrupt officials profit from the black market trade in rare wood species, which is being exported to Vietnam — and beyond.

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The Aoral Wildlife Sanctuary in Kampong Speu province is just a three-hour drive from Cambodia's capital, Phnom Penh. But the scenery here couldn't be more different than in the sprawling metropolis — even a military outpost in the reserve is peaceful and picturesque. A traditional stilt house has hammocks, chickens, and ice-cold beer. Outside, a few soldiers are playing pétanque as a black pig snuffles the earth.

Read more: Corruption fueling deforestation in Cambodia

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Grown in floods and thriving without pesticides, floating rice offers Cambodia a sustainable alternative for its eco-friendly food production amid threats from climate change.
A Cambodian boy rides on a buffalo on his way back from a floating rice field. Once common in the Lower Mekong Basin, this eco-friendly farming method is drifting towards disappearance in the region. (Photo: Pichayada Promchertchoo)

KAMPONG THOM, Cambodia- The sky is pitch black when Than Bunthorn leaves home for the paddy field. His body sways atop an old oxcart as it bumps along a small dirt track. Dawn is still some hours away. But for the farmer, work begins as early as 3am.

Read more: Floating rice: The climate-resilient alternative for Cambodia’s food production

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EARTH Hour 2018 switch-off will take place on March 24 at 8.30pm.

Earth Hour, WWF’s landmark movement, is set to again unite millions of people around the world to show their commitment to the planet. As our one shared home faces the dual challenge of climate change and plummeting biodiversity, the world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment aims to mobilize individuals, businesses and governments to be a part of the conversation and solutions needed to build a healthy, sustainable future – and planet – for all.

In Brunei Darussalam, Earth Hour goes back to the grassroots and spread the awareness among the public on the initiative that has been implemented by other NGOs as well as the government. In particular, we will be focussing on the forests by connecting the dots between biodiversity and climate change.

“Coastal area such as mangroves forest can store up to five times more carbon than tropical forests. Not only they are able to protect us from flood, they also provide an ecosystem for other species like proboscis monkey, which I believe can contribute to eco-tourism. Brunei also has varieties of plant species that need to be protected as they contain elements for medical purposes that need to be developed and researched even further,” said Mohd RimeyHaji Osman, Country Manager, Earth Hour in Brunei.

Earth-Hour

Read more: Earth Hour to spark global awareness, action for healthy planet

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Malaysia continues to be one of the biggest greenhouse gas emitters in ASEAN. What can Kuala Lumpur do?

Image Credit: Deva Darshan on Unsplash

More than two years after a historic agreement was reached in Paris under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Malaysia continues to be one of the biggest greenhouse gas emitters among the members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). With an average of 7.7 metric tons of CO2 emissions per capita, Malaysia is, in fact, second only to Brunei Darussalam in this measure, which itself emits 22.9 metric tons of CO2 per capita. If Malaysia is to meet its international commitments, a lot of work must be done to reduce the carbon intensity of the country’s industry.

Read more: How to Green Malaysian Electricity

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