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Climate Change News

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Hospitals in Asia must become climate-smart in an era of extreme weather patterns, or risk being unable to fulfill their missions of providing healthcare when they are most needed, say experts. 

After Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the Philippines, the power sector was one of the hardest hit as 90 per cent of the transmission towers and electricity poles were either toppled or broken in the disaster region. Image: Richard Whitcombe / Shutterstock.com

When Typhoon Haiyan ripped through the island of Leyte in the Philippines in 2013, it destroyed the local power grid and left 300 towns and millions of residents without electricity for months, including small hospitals and health facilities. 

Read more: Why hospitals in Asia need to be ‘climate-smart’

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The BioCarbon Engineering team and their double propeller quadro-copter drone they hope will mean a brighter future for Myanmar's depleted mangroves [Ivan Ogilvie/ Al Jazeera]

Since 1978, one million hectares of mangroves have been cut down in Myanmar. In the Ayerwaddy Delta in the south, mangrove forests have been significantly depleted - often cut down to make way for shrimp and rice farming, as well as charcoal production and collecting palm oil.

Read more: Cyclone shield: Breathing new life into Myanmar's mangroves

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School children join the first tsunami drill at BEHS 1 Kungyangon in Yangon in January. Zarni Phyo/The Myanmar Times

Vice President U Henry Van Thio is a possessed man, running here and there, to check on the preparations of local governments in response to the perennial threats of the monsoon, which is just around the corner.

Read more: Disaster-prone Myanmar presses alert button as monsoon looms

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Favorable weather conditions and improved yields have helped drive a return to growth in Myanmar’s agricultural sector, a trend likely to be supported by government efforts to embrace modern farming methods to ensure long-term sustainable development.

The agriculture sector in Myanmar grew by 3.5% in FY 2017/18, which ended on March 31, rebounding from a drought-induced contraction recorded in FY 2016/17

The agriculture sector grew by 3.5% in FY 2017/18, which ended on March 31, rebounding from a drought-induced contraction recorded in FY 2016/17, according to the Asian Development Outlook 2018 report, released by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in early April.

Read more: Myanmar Agriculture Rebounds From A Drought-Induced Contraction

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Jim Bridenstine is the administrator of NASA. (AFP pic)

NASA’s new administrator, a former lawmaker nominated by President Donald Trump to lead the US space agency, admitted on Wednesday he has changed his mind about climate change and now believes that humans are the main driver of greenhouse gas emissions.

Read more: NASA’s new chief changes mind, now accepts climate change

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The Universiti Putra Malaysia’s Faculty of Environmental Studies team taking a group picture.

When members of the Freshwater Fisheries Society (Peniat) in Tanjung Tualang, Perak, found that their fishing areas were invaded by water hyacinth, which caused a drop in the number of catches two years ago, they knew they needed help to curb the deteriorating quality of the lake ecosystem.

Read more: Keeping freshwater fisheries area healthy

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The climate justice movement highlights the fact that rich nations are overwhelmingly to blame for causing climate change, but that poor ones have been the first to cope with its impacts. (AFP pic)

LONDON: People around the world beset by drought, heatwaves, rising seas, and storm surges made worse by global warming are calling for “climate justice,” and many are pleading their case in court.

Read more: Climate victims seek justice in the courtroom and on the street

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The making of a truly green city begins with calculating its carbon emissions, and then introducing policies that will spur the transition to renewable energy, say officials from San Carlos City in the Philippines.

The SaCasol Solar Farm is divided into four phases which collectively produce 45 MW of solar energy. Image: SaCaSol

San Carlos City in Negros Occidental, the Philippines, was once home to one of the country’s biggest sugar mills. But as the growth of the sugar industry has slowed since the 1980s, the city has sought alternative means of generating revenue. It has harnessed one of its most abundant natural resources: sunshine.

Read more: This small city in the Philippines is taking big steps to curb emissions

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BISCAST-CCRPH

The climate change resilient pilot house (CCRPH) of the Bicol State College for Applied Sciences and Technology (BISCAST) in Naga City, Philippines is ready for scaling up as it secures approval from the Accreditation of Innovative Technologies for Housing (AITECH) of the Philippine National Housing Authority (NHA) last December 2017.

Read more: Climate-resilient housing technology in Naga state college, ready for scaling up

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The City of Bogor enjoys more frequent rain showers than any part of Indonesia. Dubbed as the Rain City, locals often tell visitors that it almost always rains in their area even during the dry months. Cradled by three mountains, Mount Salak, Mount Gede, and Mount Pangrango, residents of the municipality are blessed with a cool climate, which also made Bogor a popular retreat destination especially for the wealthy.  The quaint and bucolic city is home to at least 5.7 million people (2017 State Statistics). Located just 60 kilometers south of Jakarta, Bogor is often seen as the extension of the capital itself. The current President, Joko Widodo, who hails from Bogor, is known to hold office there. A busy city whose residents are mostly part of the working force, a considerable portion of its population also commute and work to Jakarta on a daily basis.

The City of Bogor enjoys more frequent rain showers than any part of Indonesia. Dubbed as the Rain City, locals often tell visitors that it almost always rains in their area even during the dry months. Cradled by three mountains, Mount Salak, Mount Gede, and Mount Pangrango, residents of the municipality are blessed with a cool climate, which also made Bogor a popular retreat destination especially for the wealthy.

Read more: Addressing climate risks through community-driven interventions: The Story of Sindang Rasa in...

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