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Climate Change News

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Conflict and climate change have pushed 124 million people in 51 countries into acute food security, a situation when the inability to consume adequate food represents an immediate danger to people’s lives and livelihoods. In 2017, the number of people affected by acute food insecurity increased by 11 million.

Read more: Report: More People at Risk of Hunger Because of Conflict and Climate Change

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It was predictable that one day Adisa Azapagic, who studies the carbon footprint of various foods, would get around to chocolate. Little was known about the environmental impact of producing that guilt-and swoon-inducing pleasure, and for many, ignorance was bliss. “My husband wasn’t amused when I suggested he consider switching to dark chocolate,” which has a smaller carbon footprint than milk chocolate, she said. “He said it was a divorcing issue.”

Read more: Keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet with this one easy fix

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Seagrass meadows in the vast Indonesian archipelago. Credit: Dr. Richard Unsworth

Research led by Swansea University's Bioscience department has found that the world center of biodiversity is under widespread threat of losing a key marine resource.

Read more: Center of world's marine biodiversity is in danger

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The conservation of the forest is also one of the main reasons for the establishment of the sanctuary.(Image Credit: MonkeyChild)

A new wildlife sanctuary in Oddar Meanchey, a Northwestern province of Cambodia is going to be established as The Royal Government of Cambodia has recently issued the statement.

Read more: Cambodia to establish a new wildlife sanctuary

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The breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis.

Scientists explain how plastic-eating enzyme can help fight pollution – video

Scientists have created a mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drinks bottles – by accident. The breakthrough could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis by enabling for the first time the full recycling of bottles.

Read more: Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottles

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A leading DFID-funded programme called Action on Climate Today (ACT), has released a new paper ‘Mainstreaming, accessing and institutionalizing finance for climate change adaptation’. 

Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to adaptation action, and ACT’s framework helps governments to identify, track and measure climate adaptation finance through their budgets. This is the first of a series of reports based on ACT’s work in South Asia.

New framework ensures effective government financing for climate adaptation

  • The cost of climate change adaptation in South Asia could be as much as US$500 billion per year by 20501. Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to climate adaptation action. However, few countries have successfully accounted for public spending on climate adaptation.
  • A new framework that makes sure government spending on adaptation is effective, has been successfully tested in South Asia.
  • The new framework - Financing Framework for Resilient Growth (FFRG) – can help countries integrate climate change adaptation into their plans, policies, and budgets at the national and subnational level.
  • This framework helps governments identify climate spending for adaptation issues, track it through departmental budgets, understand the scale of need for new funding, and plan for and access new sources of climate finance.
  • The Action on Climate Today (ACT) programme has applied the FFRG in four South Asian countries: Afghanistan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan.

Read more: New framework helps governments meet climate spending goals

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Lat Phrao Canal Housing in Bangkok, Thailand

From 1990 to 2010, Southeast Asia was the fastest growing carbon emitter in the world, according to the Asia Development Bank. Although its historical share of global greenhouse gas emissions – primarily carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide –  is not as large, the region is on a trajectory that will make it a significant emitter in the future.

Read more: How Architecture Is Tackling Increasing Floods From Climate Change

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Bangkok

Thailand seems likely to emerge as a model of green building in Asia, a region that is urbanizing more rapidly than any other in the world. Last month, the country took a significant step by submitting two Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change: greening Thailand’s low- and middle-income housing, and greening the country’s government buildings.

Read more: Building for green growth in Thailand

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(File pix) Mangrove forests provide multiple ecosystem services and benefits to humans and nature. Their full functions and roles are still way beyond our understanding.

No matter how sturdy they seem to be, or how eerie they may appear, mangrove forests deserve vigilant attention and tender loving care.

Read more: On our love affair with Malaysian mangroves

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Our food – from what we eat to how it is grown – accounts for more carbon emissions than transport and yet staple crops will be hit hard by global warming.

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Did you know that what’s on your plate plays a larger role in contributing to climate change than the car you drive? When most wealthy people think about their carbon footprint or their contributions to climate change, they’ll think about where their electricity and heat come from or what they drive. They’ll think about fossil fuels and miles per gallon, about LED lights and mass transit – but not so much about combine harvesters or processed meals or food waste. Few consider the impacts of the food they eat, despite the fact that globally, food systems account for roughly one quarter of all manmade greenhouse gas emissions. That’s more than the entire transportation sector, more than all industrial practices, and roughly the same as the production of electricity and heat.

Read more: Why what we eat is crucial to the climate change question

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