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Climate Change News

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Stunning images of Antarctica and a new documentary ‘From Asia to Antarctica’ tell the story of the connection between the two continents for the first time

Eco-Business today officially launched Changing Course, an exhibition that tells the climate change story through a unique Asian lens. This film and photography exhibition is part of Eco-Business’s larger Changing Course campaign on climate action. It documents the ClimateForce: Antarctica 2018 expedition in March led by Sir Robert Swan, a British environmentalist, and explorer who was the first man to walk to both North and South Poles.

Read more: Changing Course, a film and photography exhibition, opens to the public at the Singapore Botanic...

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A “one-stop-shop” information portal for the efficient implementation of climate change mitigation activities in key sectors of agriculture, waste, industry, transport, forestry, and energy has been launched by the Climate Change Commission (CCC).

Read more: CCC launches a “one-stop-shop” information portal

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Seagrasses (above) are found in coastal waters all over the world, apart from at the poles.PHOTO: SITI MARYAM YAAKUB

The verdant meadows of the sea are up to 35 times better than rainforests at storing carbon and are nurseries for all manner of marine creatures. Yet, about 40 percent of the world's seagrass may have been lost due to human activity.

Read more: Seagrasses can offset climate change

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A pod of pilot whales struggling not to beach themselves off the waters of Scotland, 2011. Photo: Getty Images

A male pilot whale struggled for five days to stay alive in Thailand near the Malaysian border after rescuers found it with 17 pounds of plastic bags in its stomach, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, but it ultimately succumbed to its illnesses.

Read more: Pilot Whale Dies in Thailand After Being Found With 17 Pounds of Plastic Bags in Its Stomach

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A scene of devastation in Japan after the 11 March earthquake and tsunami in 2011. Natural disasters are expected to intensify in strength thanks to climate change. Image: Warren Antiola, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Disaster risk management has always been a high priority in Southeast Asia, but climate change is making the problem all the more urgent and challenging, writes NUS’Vinod Thomas.

Southeast Asia, already on the path of tropical storms originating from the Western Pacific and Indian Oceans, has seen a spike in climate disasters as global warming aggravates these hazards of nature. The dangers are compounded by the fact that the region also has a high population density, with large urban populations in low-lying cities, including the megacities, Jakarta and Manila.

Read more: Climate change raises the bar for disaster resilience

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Ath Hemvijitphan, deputy country chairman, The Shell Company of Thailand Limited, shares his vision at the Thailand SDGs Forum 2018.

The Shell Company of Thailand Limited recently participated in the Thailand SDGs Forum 2018: Localising the SDGs (Thailand’s Sustainable Business Guide) seminar organized by online news agencyThaipublica and the Thailand Sustainable Development Foundation.

Read more: Shell commits to ‘Believe-Become-Belong’ concept

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In a media training at the 2018 Asia-Pacific Rainforest Summit, journalists visited the Baros Mangrove Conservation Area. CIFOR Photo/Ulet Ifansasti

Indonesia - Despite growing pressures of development and urbanization, community members from Sendangsari village in Indonesia’s Yogyakarta province improved the local economy through sustainably managing their teak forest.

Read more: From the soil to the law, climate change efforts in Indonesia

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Climate models predict that an increase in greenhouse gases will dry out the Amazon rainforest in the future while causing wetter conditions in the woodlands of Africa and Indonesia. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and other institutions have identified an unexpected but major factor in this worldwide precipitation shift: the direct response of the forests themselves to higher levels of carbon dioxide.

Read more: Scientists project a drier Amazon and wetter Indonesia in the future

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As carbon dioxide rises due to the burning of fossil fuels, rice will lose some of its protein and vitamin content, putting millions of people at risk of malnutrition, scientists warned on Wednesday.

Read more: Global warming may have 'devastating' effects on rice: study

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