KC3_2

Climate Change News

Story

By: Arlina Arshad, The Strait Times

Just a decade ago, Kendari was among the filthiest cities in Indonesia. Bins overflowed with bags ofmouldy rice, rotting food scraps and plastic bottles. Reeking garbage was burned or left uncollected on the streets for weeks, attracting flies and roaches.

But today, the city of half a million people in south-east Sulawesi province has been spectacularly transformed, winning national cleanliness awards for eight straight years.

Read more: When waste isn’t wasted: How a small Indonesian city turned garbage into electricity

Story

That’s not java jive: shifting weather patterns mean the industry faces major upheaval within a generation, even as demand explodes.

Read more: The coffee industry is getting roasted by climate change

Story

The sunny island nation is harnessing the power of the sun to charge the development of its clean energy industry. In the run up to the Asia Clean Energy Summit in October 2017, Eco-Business looks back at the evolution of Singapore’s solar sector over the last decade.

The sunrise over Singapore's highly urbanised landscape. Can one of the world's most densely populated countries harvest solar energy from building facades? Image: Bo Nielsen, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Read more: Singapore’s 10-year journey in urban solar

Story

Along with taking lives and causing millions of dollars in property damage, the wildfires in California this week are scorching the land in another way: Millions of trees are being destroyed. The blazes have charred more than 770,000 acres in the state alone, as fires around the country seemingly grow more destructive by the year. 

Yet even that eye-opening number is a fraction of the devastation happening globally. The planet loses billions of trees every year due to a range of factors, including fire, illegal logging and clearance for agriculture.

"Trees are being lost at the rate of about a football field a second," said David Skole, professor of forestry at Michigan State University. "If you're watching the Michigan Wolverines play Michigan State and they go into overtime, every time the clock ticks down, a forest the size of that field disappears."  

A swath of burning forest is seen during "Operation Green Wave" conducted by agents of the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources to combat illegal logging in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, August 4, 2017. BRUNO KELLY / REUTERS

Read more: This company wants to regrow Earth's forests with drones

Story

Writer-director Tara Illenberger during the shoot of High Tide, the Best Picture at the second TOFARM filmfest

MANILA, Philippines — When the ocean reaches its highest level, writer-director Tara Illenberger’s High Tide, a film on how mangroves save coastal-dwelling Filipinos, wins Best Picture at the second TOFARM Film Festival. For the jurors, Laurice Guillen, Christopher de Leon, Mario Hernando, Gardy Labad, and Jess Navarro, the universality of the feature’s climate change theme gives it extraordinary global relevance.

Read more: Tara brings new high to Ilonggo cinema

Story

Changing dynamics in dengue cases in the Philippines, partially caused by increasing temperatures, have left more people vulnerable to the disease.

The term “climate change” evokes images of destruction brought by typhoons and droughts in the minds of most Filipinos. However, the public needs to take notice of how it also affects their health and well-being, even without these extreme events.

Read more: How climate change impacts health in the Philippines

Story

Photo credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

The Philippines’ Commission on Human Rights has had a busy year thanks to a dispute with President Rodrigo Duterte over police killings in the drug war, but it’s about to tackle another blockbuster: an effort to hold fossil fuel companies responsible for the human rights abuses inherent in climate change.

Read more: Philippines Climate Case Could Find Fossil Fuel Companies Violate Human Rights

Story

The deadly storms that battered the US East Coast, the Caribbean and South Asia are the latest and most emphatic evidence of the worldwide spike in extreme floods and storms.

Read more: How disaster resilience has saved lives

Story

MANILA, Philippines – Ideas to recycle waste products and promote agriculture – these were just some of the concepts pitched by finalists in the environment and climate change category of the 2017 HackSociety semi-final round held on Friday, September 15.

Read more: #HackSociety 2017: Ideas to manage waste, sustain food production

Story

Scientists say that brightening the billowy clouds over oceans could let them rebound more sunlight back into the atmosphere, instead of letting them strike the Earth's surface  Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-ways-climate.html#jCp
Dismissed a decade ago as far-fetched and dangerous, schemes to tame global warming by engineering the climate have migrated from the margins of policy debate towards center stage.

Read more: 'Plan B': Seven ways to engineer the climate

Story

KC3 Community Directory
Twitter_KC3_new
FB_SEARCA_KC3