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Climate Change News

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Timor-Leste’s response to the El Niño emergency in 2015-16 has exposed the challenges ahead as climate-induced disasters become commonplace in the future.

Read more: Lessons From The Field: Timor-Leste And El Niño – Analysis

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Handover of five rainwater harvesting tanks

Communities of Luro in Lautem municipality, Timor-Leste, gathered on October28th2017 for the handover ceremonies of five rainwater harvesting tanks. The tanks, made offeror-cement can hold 10,000 liters of rain and spring water and provides water to 15-20 household members for group-managed horticulture activities. Seven more tanks are due for handover soon to seven otheraldeias(sub-villages). The installation of the tanks comes as part of the Integrated Actions for Resilience and Adaptation (IA4RA) to climate change project that works in the nine villages in the area of the Raumoco Watershed.

Read more: European Union supports Timorese rural communities to adapt to climate change

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Mr Masagos Zulkifli stressed Singapore’s commitment to fight climate change, given that the island-state is vulnerable to the environmental impact. TODAY file photo

SINGAPORE — Next year will be designated the “Year of Climate Action” for Singapore, the Environment and Water Resources Minister announced on Thursday (Nov 16).

Read more: S’pore declares 2018 as ‘Year of Climate Action’

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ASIA’s responses to global climate change underpin the very survival of humankind and other life forms on this planet.

Read more: Towards a carbon-neutral Malaysia by 2050

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(FILES) A photo taken on September 22, 2014, shows fish swimming through the coral on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Coral bred in one part of the Great Barrier Reef was successfully transplanted into another area, Australian scientists said Sunday, in a project they hope could restore damaged ecosystems around the world. AFP PHOTO

SYDNEY: Coral bred in one part of the Great Barrier Reef was successfully transplanted into another area, Australian scientists said Sunday, in a project they hope could restore damaged ecosystems around the world.

Read more: Coral transplant raises Barrier Reef survival hopes

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Companies that pump plenty of CO2 into the atmosphere should be made to pay for it. Photo Credit: Flickr

He’s been dubbed “the father of climate change awareness,” and veteran NASA scientist James Hansen has an answer to how we can rein in our wanton CO2 emissions. The answer: we should sue the worst polluters to make them legally accountable for their actions.

Read more: ‘Make Companies Pay’ for Adding to Climate Change

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How the Indonesian media toes the line between the need for economic development and environmental sustainability.

Read more: Indonesia's green information gap

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The picturesque Bamboo Forest in Kyoto, Japan. (Shutterstock/File)

Cultivating bamboo could help Indonesia mitigate the impacts of climate change, an Indonesian environmental scientist said during a side event of the United Nations climate conference in Bonn, Germany.

Read more: Indonesia plants bamboo to fight climate change

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  • Indonesia will establish 1,000 “eco-mosques,” the country’s vice president announced at this month’s UN climate summit in Bonn.
  • The Southeast Asian nation is home to some 260 million people. Nearly 90 percent of them identify as Muslim, according to 2010 census data.
  • Indonesia also has some of the greatest expanses of rainforests, peatlands and mangroves — carbon-rich environments that are rapidly disappearing as industry expands.

Indonesia will establish 1,000 “eco-mosques,” the country’s vice president announced at this month’s UN climate summit in Bonn.

Read more: Indonesian mosques to take up the mantle of fighting climate change

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At a very young age, Blake Holiday saw the future and it was on two wheels.

“I’ve always loved bicycles,” he says. “When I was 6, my dad taught me how to ride a bike in our front yard. I remember quite clearly the feeling of riding across that yard after my dad let go and hearing the wind in my ears and experiencing that feeling of being free. Then I ran right into a thorny bush and got cut up pretty badly. But I was hooked. And here I am 40 years later, still in love with riding my bike.”

Except now he’s riding for a cause and helping thousands of others do the same. After working for five years as a guide at Backroads Bicycling — an adventure company where he led biking, hiking, and multi-sport trips in Utah, Hawaii, Italy, the Pacific Northwest, and the Napa Valley — two of his friends from Backroads, Caeli Quinn, and Geraldine Carter, had what Holiday, now 47, calls “a crazy idea.” They wanted to stage a multi-day bike ride from New York City to Washington, D.C., to raise money and awareness for climate change. In September 2008, the three organized what they thought would be a one-time event and had about 100 people sign up to ride and fundraise to benefit climate-related organizations — something that no one else was doing at the time.

Climate Ride participants pose in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., a repeat destination for riders. (Photo: Submitted)

Read more: Pedal power: Palm Springs cyclist rallies support to counter climate change with international rides

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