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Thailand

Bangkok

Thailand seems likely to emerge as a model of green building in Asia, a region that is urbanizing more rapidly than any other in the world. Last month, the country took a significant step by submitting two Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change: greening Thailand’s low- and middle-income housing, and greening the country’s government buildings.

Read more: Building for green growth in Thailand

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Lat Phrao Canal Housing in Bangkok, Thailand

From 1990 to 2010, Southeast Asia was the fastest growing carbon emitter in the world, according to the Asia Development Bank. Although its historical share of global greenhouse gas emissions – primarily carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide –  is not as large, the region is on a trajectory that will make it a significant emitter in the future.

Read more: How Architecture Is Tackling Increasing Floods From Climate Change

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KUALA LUMPUR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Trafficked into work and routinely abused, migrant fishermen in Thailand are still subject to forced labor despite efforts by the government to clean up the industry, advocacy groups said on Tuesday.

Migrant workers prepare to unload their catch at a port in Samut Sakhon province, Thailand, January 22, 2018. Picture taken January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

KUALA LUMPUR (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Trafficked into work and routinely abused, migrant fishermen in Thailand are still subject to forced labor despite efforts by the government to clean up the industry, advocacy groups said on Tuesday.

Thailand’s multibillion-dollar seafood sector came under scrutiny in recent years after investigations showed widespread slavery, trafficking and violence on fishing boats and in onshore processing facilities.

Read more: 'It was torture': Grim tales in Thai fishing sector despite reforms

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