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Southeast Asia

The world’s largest conservation congress kicks-off today in Hawai’i and the Pacific Community has joined over 8,000 global leaders and decision-makers from government, civil society, indigenous groups, business and academia, to garner support for stronger action towards a imagesustainable future.

The Pacific Community Director-General, Dr Colin Tukuitonga, is attending the Pacific Ocean Summit at the start of the IUCN Congress and will moderate a session on Action on Climate Change – reducing emissions, increasing renewable energy, which will include addresses from the President of the Republic of Marshall Islands,  Dr Hilda Heine, the Prime Minister of Tuvalu, Enele Sopoaga and the Kingdom of Tonga’s Deputy Prime Minister, Siaosi Sovaleni.

The Summit provides an opportunity to launch the 2030 Ocean Partnership for action on the world’s largest ocean with an aim to make commitments for action on climate change as well as renewable energy and for the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal (14) on Oceans.

“We’re at a critical juncture in terms of the global response to climate change. Pacific Island countries and territories have committed to bold initiatives in terms of enhancing renewable energy production, adapting to climate change and strengthening the resilience of ecosystems,” Dr Tukuitonga said.

Read more: Pacific Community highlights climate change, resilience and sustainable fisheries at World...

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In this Aug. 26, 2016 file photo, commuters and motorists go on their way as heavy monsoon rains inundate low-lying areas in Manila, Philippines. Typhoons that slam into land in the northwestern Pacific _ especially the biggest tropical cyclones of the bunch _ have gotten considerably stronger since the 1970s, a new study concludes. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez, File)

Typhoons that slam into land in the northwestern Pacific — especially the biggest tropical cyclones of the bunch — have gotten considerably stronger since the 1970s, a new study concludes.

Read more: Study: Typhoons That Slam Asia Getting Much Stronger

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Water security in Asia and the Pacific has progressed overall in the past 5 years but major challenges remain.

STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN – Water security in Asia and Pacific has progressed overall in the past 5 years, but major challenges remain, including overexploited groundwater, demand from rising populations, and climate variability, according to a new report from the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

Read more: Asia Pacific Shows Progress in Water Security, But Challenges Remain – ADB

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