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Indonesia

JAKARTA, April 12 (UPI) -- Because of their potential for storing carbon, Indonesia's wetlands -- which include mangroves and freshwater peat forests -- are integral in the fight against climate change, experts say.

Unless Indonesia preserves its 7.41 million acres of mangrove forests -- representing 23 percent of the world's total -- the country's climate change mitigation programs would be pointless, said Daniel Murdiyarso, a senior researcher from the Center for International Forestry Research at the organization's conference Monday in Sanur, Bali, the Jakarta Post reports.

Mangroves should have adequate protection, Murdiyarso said, calling for Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono to keep his pledge for Indonesia to change its status from "a net emitter" to "a net sink" for carbon by 2030. The rate of deforestation for Indonesia's mangrove forests now stands at approximately 7 percent a year.

Read more: Indonesia's carbon-rich wetlands essential

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Nusa Dua, Bali. The Indonesian Environment Ministry and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization warned countries on Friday to address the growing threat to food security posed by climate change. 

The FAO’s assistant director general, Modibo Traore, said climate change had increased the threat of famine worldwide. He was speaking at the opening of the one-day Ministerial Conference on Biodiversity, Food Security and Climate Change in Nusa Dua. 

Climate change has already caused global food shortages, especially in countries dependent on imports, he said. 

Read more: Warning on Food Security, Call for Action in Bali

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The recent price increases of agricultural commodities such as chili peppers and rice are alarm bells reminding us again that there are still many fundamental problems in our agriculture sector. (EPA Photo)The recent price increases of agricultural commodities such as chili peppers and rice are alarm bells reminding us again that there are still many fundamental problems in our agriculture sector. 

In January 2011, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization’s Food Price Index, a measure of the monthly price change of five basic food commodity groups, rose by 3.4 percent from December 2010, touching its highest level since the index began in 1990. 

Food price volatility does not significantly affect countries that do not depend on imported food; however, it will hit food-importing countries, commonly inhabited by large populations of poor people, including Indonesia. 

Read more: Eco-Agriculture Can Feed the World And Help Save the Environment

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