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Indonesia

 

The price of chilly pepper has increased by 120%, fruits and vegetables have skyrocketed. Fishermen grounded by extreme weather, rice production is not enough to feed the entire population. The Government speaks of serious "threat"; economists promote research.

Jakarta - Climate change and "extreme" weather conditions are likely to cripple the food industry in Indonesia. This danger has been confirmed by the Minister for National Development Planning, who speaks of serious "threat" to the nation's food supply. The chilly pepper has reached exorbitant prices, the cost of fruit and vegetables increases continuously, even the quantity of fish has fallen while rice production is not sufficient to meet the needs of the population.

Read more: Indonesia sounds alarm, climate change will affect food production

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JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Indonesia wants to build a huge dike to protect its sprawling capital from rising seas.

Jakarta Gov. Fauzi Bowo said Thursday that construction should be finished by 2025, though details of its exact size and cost will be hammered out during meetings next month.

Flooding in the city of 13 million kills dozens every year.

Read more: Indonesia plans dike to protect sinking capital

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Climate change has contributed to people’s susceptibility to skin cancer, respiratory problems and other diseases, an official says.

Health Ministry Director General of disease control and environmental sanitation Tjandra Yoga Aditama said Thursday the depleting ozone layer had increased the risk of skin cancer for people in Indonesia.

“Rising temperatures due to climate change also increased the concentration of ozone on the earth’s surface, which can cause respiratory diseases,” Tjandra said, as quoted by Antara news agency on Thursday.

The change in climate also aggravated biodiversity loss, including plants that are used as raw material for medicines.

He said changes in ecosystem functioning coupled with land degradation would help speed up the spread of diseases and deplete water resources.

Access to clean water and good sanitation would then be limited.

Read more: Climate change increases health risks

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