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Sustainably managed forests are a key to meeting energy needs of almost a third of the world's population. UN Photo/Logan Abassi

21 March 2017 – Cautioning the impact of human activity such as practices use of woodfuel on world’s forests, the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) today called for better wood-energy conversions technologies and more sustainable management of forests so that everyone benefits.

Read more: Greener energy for a third of the world bodes well for all, says UN on International Forest Day

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The next time a sleek sports car streaks past you on the highway or a jet aircraft roars overhead, think about this: a world where these are fueled by wood.

Wood and energy are a natural match, and as we mark the International Day of Forests on 21 March, even the sky holds no limits when we imagine a future powered by woodfuel. In fact, late last year, one North American airline laid claim to launching the world’s first commercial flight using jet fuel made from tree stumps and branches left over from wood-processing – one example of how forestry by-products and residue are being recycled into different forms of wood energy.

Read more: Forests and Energy: Using Wood to Fuel a Sustainable, Green Economy

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Research suggests an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations could cause changes in the jet stream over the North Atlantic flight corridor, leading to a spike in air turbulence.PHOTO: BLOOMBERG

WASHINGTON (WASHINGTON POST) - Flight turbulence could increase significantly under climate change, a study warns, potentially upping the risk of injury - or at least flight anxiety - for future airline passengers.

Furthermore, fuel and maintenance costs for carriers could rise.

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations could cause changes in the jet stream over the North Atlantic flight corridor, leading to a spike in air turbulence, the research conducted by atmospheric scientist Paul Williams of the University of Reading, suggests.

By the middle of the century, with no effort to reduce atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, the volume of airspace experiencing light turbulence would increase by about 59 per cent.

Airspace experiencing severe turbulence could increase by anywhere from 36 per cent to 188 per cent, the study found.

Read more: Fasten your seat belts: Climate change could increase air turbulence

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