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Members of the indigenous community in La Roya, Peru (Photo: Juan Carlos Huayllapuma/CIFOR).

REDD+ has potential to exacerbate conflicts over land and abuses of Indigenous Peoples' rights, unless it is reoriented to promote participation and to strengthen indigenous rights. In a new publication from the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), scientists Juan Pablo Sarmiento Barletti and Anne Larson analyze multiple allegations of abuses of the rights of Indigenous Peoples in the context of readiness and implementation of the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism, part of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC).

Read more: REDD+ potential for abuses indicates need for indigenous rights-based approach

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November 8 marks the fourth anniversary of Haiyan’s landfall in the Philippines. The super typhoon was the strongest ever to make landfall.

Today, the world continues to be devastated by even more extreme weather events. This year alone saw flooding in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Vietnam, and the United States; drought in Somalia; Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria in the Caribbean and the U.S.; and just last week, Storm Herwart in Germany, Czech Republic, and Poland.

Read more: Fighting the Creeping Catastrophe of Climate Change

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* Any views expressed in this article are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters Foundation.

We know climate change will heavily impact communities’ access to clean drinking water and decent sanitation systems – but the inability of local, national and international institutions to coordinate means that available climate finance is not being matched with solid plans to help those in need. It’s time for a clear path of action.

The headline figure for helping developing countries cope with climate change -- $100bn pledged by wealthy countries in the lead-up to the Paris climate treaty – sounded impressive. However, getting that money released is only the first part of the struggle. Those governments with nations and communities already struggling with a changing climate are failing to get to grips with how to channel that money to where it is most needed: to assist the poorest and most vulnerable people. 

Read more: From climate change prevention to climate protection

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