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Global warming is said to be bringing temperatures last seen during an interglacial era, when sea level was 6-9 meters (20-30ft) higher than today.

A coal-fired power station. ‘Massive CO2 extraction’ costing trillions is needed in order to avoid runaway temperature rises, says a new paper. Photograph: Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images

The global temperature has increased to a level not seen for 115,000 years, requiring daunting technological advances that will cost the coming generations hundreds of trillions of dollars, according to the scientist widely credited with bringing climate change to the public’s attention.

Read more: Planet at its hottest in 115,000 years thanks to climate change, experts say

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Resources freed up by eliminating costly fossil fuel subsidies can be redirected to clean energy investments. A solar farm in Samoa.

HONG KONG, CHINA – Developing Asia stands to gain far more than it will need to pay to shift to low-carbon growth, says a new Asian Development Bank (ADB) report.

Keeping global temperature increases below 2 degrees Celsius, as agreed at the 2015 Paris climate summit, will require developing Asia to spend an additional net $300 billion per year on clean-energy infrastructure alone through 2050. The finding is set forth in a special theme chapter, “Meeting the Low-Carbon Growth Challenge” in an update to its flagship annual economic publication, Asian Development Outlook 2016.

Read more: Asia Can Reap Solid Returns From Low-Carbon Transition – ADB

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How temperatures across the globe compared with normal during August 2016. Credit: NASA

In what has become a common refrain this year, last month ranked as the hottest August on record, according to NASA data released Monday. Not only that, but the month tied July as the hottest month the world has seen in the last 136 years.

August came in at 1.76˚F (0.98˚C) above the average from 1951-1980, 0.16C above August 2014, the previous record holder. The record keeps 2016 on track to be the hottest year in the books by a fair margin.

That August continued the streak of record hot months this year and tied July as the hottest month was somewhat unexpected. The seasonal temperature cycle generally reaches a peak in July, as it did this year. But August was so anomalously warm — more so even than July — that it tied that month’s overall temperature.

Read more: August Declared Hottest on Record: NASA

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