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Conflict and climate change have pushed 124 million people in 51 countries into acute food security, a situation when the inability to consume adequate food represents an immediate danger to people’s lives and livelihoods. In 2017, the number of people affected by acute food insecurity increased by 11 million.

Read more: Report: More People at Risk of Hunger Because of Conflict and Climate Change

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EARTH Hour 2018 switch-off will take place on March 24 at 8.30pm.

Earth Hour, WWF’s landmark movement, is set to again unite millions of people around the world to show their commitment to the planet. As our one shared home faces the dual challenge of climate change and plummeting biodiversity, the world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment aims to mobilize individuals, businesses and governments to be a part of the conversation and solutions needed to build a healthy, sustainable future – and planet – for all.

In Brunei Darussalam, Earth Hour goes back to the grassroots and spread the awareness among the public on the initiative that has been implemented by other NGOs as well as the government. In particular, we will be focussing on the forests by connecting the dots between biodiversity and climate change.

“Coastal area such as mangroves forest can store up to five times more carbon than tropical forests. Not only they are able to protect us from flood, they also provide an ecosystem for other species like proboscis monkey, which I believe can contribute to eco-tourism. Brunei also has varieties of plant species that need to be protected as they contain elements for medical purposes that need to be developed and researched even further,” said Mohd RimeyHaji Osman, Country Manager, Earth Hour in Brunei.

Earth-Hour

Read more: Earth Hour to spark global awareness, action for healthy planet

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Coral bleaching poses a threat not only to fragile reefs but to entire marine ecosystems as well. Photo Credit: www.globalcoralbleaching.org

Coral bleaching is bad news for fragile marine ecosystems. Mass bleaching of corals on a wide scale is worse news still. Yet bleaching en masse reefs around the seas are, according to scientists who have surveyed bleaching records of 100 reefs collected between 1980 and 2016 from around the tropics.

The researchers, who have published their findings in the journal Science, have found that reefs are bleaching with far more frequency than ever before in recorded memory. Worse: more frequent episodes of mass bleaching allows fragile corals less time to recover. The culprit for this phenomenon is the usual suspect: climate change that increases water temperatures.

Read more: Coral Reefs are getting KO’d by Climate Change

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