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A leading DFID-funded programme called Action on Climate Today (ACT), has released a new paper ‘Mainstreaming, accessing and institutionalizing finance for climate change adaptation’. 

Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to adaptation action, and ACT’s framework helps governments to identify, track and measure climate adaptation finance through their budgets. This is the first of a series of reports based on ACT’s work in South Asia.

New framework ensures effective government financing for climate adaptation

  • The cost of climate change adaptation in South Asia could be as much as US$500 billion per year by 20501. Insufficient funding remains one of the biggest barriers to climate adaptation action. However, few countries have successfully accounted for public spending on climate adaptation.
  • A new framework that makes sure government spending on adaptation is effective, has been successfully tested in South Asia.
  • The new framework - Financing Framework for Resilient Growth (FFRG) – can help countries integrate climate change adaptation into their plans, policies, and budgets at the national and subnational level.
  • This framework helps governments identify climate spending for adaptation issues, track it through departmental budgets, understand the scale of need for new funding, and plan for and access new sources of climate finance.
  • The Action on Climate Today (ACT) programme has applied the FFRG in four South Asian countries: Afghanistan, India, Nepal, and Pakistan.

Read more: New framework helps governments meet climate spending goals

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The American cross-country skier Jessie Diggins competing in 2016. “Saving winter is something I believe in,” she said.CreditAlexander Hassenstein/Bongarts, via Getty Images

The thrill of victory

Jessie Diggins is a cross-country skier on the American women’s team and a favorite to win a medal at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. If she succeeds, it will be only the second time the United States has won a medal in the sport and the first for an American woman.

Read more: This Olympic Skier Wants to Save the World’s Snow

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Food systems need to change to produce more and better-quality products. Those changes should be guided by scientific evidence and involve a wide range of partners, according to Dr. Gunhild Stordalen, founder and president of the EAT Foundation.

Daily wage women laborers are seen at an agricultural paddy field as they removes paddy saplings before to replant another field outskirts of the eastern Indian state Odisha's capital city Bhubaneswar on 28 January 2018. STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

DAVOS, SWITZERLAND – The nutrition community has a lot to learn from the climate change movement, according to Dr. Gunhild Stordalen, the founder, and president of the EAT Foundation.

Read more: To Feed the World, Look to Climate Change Movement’s Model: EAT Founder

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