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The American cross-country skier Jessie Diggins competing in 2016. “Saving winter is something I believe in,” she said.CreditAlexander Hassenstein/Bongarts, via Getty Images

The thrill of victory

Jessie Diggins is a cross-country skier on the American women’s team and a favorite to win a medal at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang, South Korea. If she succeeds, it will be only the second time the United States has won a medal in the sport and the first for an American woman.

Read more: This Olympic Skier Wants to Save the World’s Snow

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Food systems need to change to produce more and better-quality products. Those changes should be guided by scientific evidence and involve a wide range of partners, according to Dr. Gunhild Stordalen, founder and president of the EAT Foundation.

Daily wage women laborers are seen at an agricultural paddy field as they removes paddy saplings before to replant another field outskirts of the eastern Indian state Odisha's capital city Bhubaneswar on 28 January 2018. STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

DAVOS, SWITZERLAND – The nutrition community has a lot to learn from the climate change movement, according to Dr. Gunhild Stordalen, the founder, and president of the EAT Foundation.

Read more: To Feed the World, Look to Climate Change Movement’s Model: EAT Founder

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Intertidal snails (Credit: Bob Peterson / Flickr)

Climate change research has experienced bourgeoning popularity over the past two decades or so, and ecophysiology is one such field where this is no exception. Overwhelming evidence now suggests that the frequency of extreme temperature events will increase in the future. Tolerance of a wide range of conditions has allowed animals to adapt to niches from the constant and benign, to the extreme and highly variable. Understanding how organisms are capable of responding to this thermal variability in their surroundings, especially those thought to already occupy highly stressful environments, helps us to anticipate species responses to a warming world.

Read more: Intertidal Snails Don’t Follow Conventional Thermal Performance Models

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