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Knowledge Showcases

Knowledge Showcases

K-SHOWCASES contains experience notes, adaptation notes, technical reports, stories on good practices, and other SEARCA publications related to climate change adaptation in Southeast Asia.

pbs 2016-3POLICY BRIEF SERIES | PBS 2016-3
by Aisa O. Manlosa and Harold Glenn A. Valera

Flooding has increased in frequency in various parts of the country, causing damage to thousands of households every year. It directly affects communities through damage to livelihood and properties, loss of earning, and health hazards. Households dependent on agriculture for livelihood are particularly vulnerable because of the negative impact of flooding to productivity.

Damage assessments following flood events are regularly done to determine extent of loss and to identify critical areas for intervention. However, these are often macroscale assessments, which
do not necessarily generate information that could be useful for policymaking. At the municipal level, planning for disaster mitigation and adaptation strategies are devolved and should be operationalized. This study sought to determine microscale damage estimates of the largest flood event in the history of Jabonga, in Agusan del Norte, in southern Philippines. Jabonga is a lakeside municipality adjacent to Lake Mainit, the fourth largest lake in the Philippines.

Data and Method

The municipality of Jabonga is located in Caraga Region, which was classified as part of the poorest cluster in 2009. Thirty-nine percent (39%) of the region’s total employment in 2010 is in the agriculture sector (Bureau of Agricultural Statistics 2011). The agriculture dependency of the municipality is higher than the regional rate, with 60 percent of the population either partly or fully dependent on farming. Seven of the municipality’s 15 barangays are prone to flooding. Since 2005, between 914 to 2,909 households in Jabonga have been annually affected by floods. On the average, farms in hazard zones are inundated for 32 days, while residential areas are flooded for 30 days. During the flooding event in the first quarter of 2011, 71 percent of the houses in the flood hazard zone sank, and the livelihood of 61 percent of the household population was affected.

Read more: Impact of Flooding on Agricultural Livelihoods in Jabonga, Agusan del Norte

Knowledge Showcases

342 huyen

2017

32 pp. 
by Nguyen Thi Huyen, Le Hoang Tu, Nguyen Duy Liem, Vo Ngoc Quyn Tram, Duong Ngoc Minh, Nguyen Kim Loi 

ISSN:19086164 (Soft cover)

 

Click here to download. 

The Srepok River basin, which flows along four provinces in Vietnam and parts of Cambodia, is presently facing critical issues such as floods and droughts, pollution of waterways, deforestation of catchments, erosion and resultant sedimentation of reservoirs, overexploitation of groundwater, water-use conflicts, and transborder issues. This study aims to investigate changes in streamflow and sediment yield that result from land use changes, and climatic variation in the Srepok watershed. Plausible scenarios of land use change are simulated through Geographic Information System (GIS) using current conditions and information from the area as bases, and climate change scenarios built on outputs of General Circulation Models (GCMs) from the Southeast Asia System for Analysis, Research and Training (SEA-START 2009).

Read more: Assessing Impacts of Land Use and Climate Change on Soil and Water Resources in the Srepok...

Knowledge Showcases

16298860 1309733379050013 3609482012626837023 nThe Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA) is proud to present this pioneering work, featuring selected case stories on climate change adaptation initiatives that are being implemented in Southeast Asia. This book Learning and Coping with Change: Case Stories of Climate Change Adaptation in Southeast Asia is the outcome of the First Regional Knowledge Sharing Writeshop on Climate Change Adaptation (CCA) in Inclusive and Sustainable Agricultural and Rural Development (ISARD) held on 15–17 April 2015 at SEARCA, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. Organized by SEARCA in partnership with the Oscar M. Lopez Center for Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Management Foundation Inc. (OML Center), the event brought together leading scientists and researchers from Cambodia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, and five international agencies and academic institutions working on agriculture and climate change.

Read more: Learning and Coping with Change: Case Stories of Climate Change Adaptation in Southeast Asia

Knowledge Showcases

327 DPS 2016 5 Pulhin Cover2016

37 pp. 
by Juan M. Pulhin 

ISSN:19086164 (Soft cover)

 

Click here to download. 

Knowledge Showcases

337 Manlosa2016

45 pp. 
by Aisa O. Manlosa, Harold Glenn A. Valera 

ISSN:19086164 (Soft cover)

 

Click here to download. 

 

This study sought to determine microscale damage estimates of the largest flood event in the history of the municipality of Jabonga in the province of Agusan del Norte. Jabonga is a lakeside municipality adjacent to Lake Mainit, the fourth largest lake in the Philippines. The study sought to on  determine flood-prone areas in the municipality, characterize the flood event that occurred in the site from December 2010 to March 2011, estimate actual and potential damage for different flood scenarios, and determine variables that are significantly related to flood vulnerability and flood damage.

Read more: Socio-economic Approach to Microscale Flood Damage Assessment in a Lakeshore Community

Knowledge Showcases

POLICY BRIEF SERIES | PBS 2016-2
by Nguyen Thi Huyen

330 2016-2Background

Soil and water resources in the world are currently under severe pressure due to human intervention and the changing of runoff patterns caused by climate and land use changes. Population growth and human activities have accelerated the speed of land use change, that in turn  affect hydrological processes. In addition, climate change may affect many aspects of natural  ecosystems. Hence, understanding of impacts of climate change and land use change on hydrological  conditions is essential to enable more efficient soil and water resources development. In the same light, Srepok catchment, whichis situated in the Central Highlands of Vietnam, is presently being challenged by many critical  issues for soil and water resources management in the Srepok river basin (Government of Vietnam 2006). However, non-linear relationships, multiple causation, lack of mechanistic understanding, and lag effects, together, limit the ability to diagnose causes. As this information is important for land use planning and water resources management, it is necessary to quantify the extent to which land use change and climate variability influence the hydrological conditions.

Read more: Assessing the Impacts of Land Use and Climate Change on Soil and Water Resources in the Srepok...

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 7 No. 5 | David I. Gustafson2

ADNCCA 7-5The world’s food systems face an escalating challenge to meet accelerating demand for sustainably-produced, nutritious food in the face of multiple threats, including human population pressure, dwindling resources, and degraded ecosystems. About 1 billion people lack sufficient food and about 2 billion people suffer from a number of micronutrient deficiencies.

Paradoxically, more than 2 billion adults are overweight, of which 500 million are obese. These current challenges to food systems and nutrition security cast an even more ominous shadow into the future when they are considered in the context of intensifying climate change. The fifth assessment report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) highlighted the effects of climate change and water availability on crop yields; the results indicate largely negative impacts on food prices and food accessibility. The US Third National Climate Assessment report also emphasized food security threats due to climate change effects on food processing, storage, transportation, and retailing. Indeed, the US team that produced this national assessment took the unusual step of issuing a special report, prompted by recent extreme weather events (i.e., drought, wildfire, storms, and flooding).

Read more: Assessing Sustainable Nutrition Security: The Role of Food Systems

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 6 No. 2 | Majah Leah V. Ravago2, James A. Roumasset3, and Karl Jandoc4

The Philippines is the second on the list of nations which are prone to disasters, according to the 2014 World Risk Report of the United Nations University. The country is highly exposed to natural disasters such as volcanic eruptions, tropical cyclones, and floods.

This vulnerability is heightened by climate change as it affects weather patterns among other natural environmental occurrences. Projections from meteorologists showed that from 2020 to 2050, wet seasons will be wetter and the dry seasons will be drier. Eighteen to 20 typhoons are expected every year with flooding projected in different parts of the country.

Read more: Helping Farm Households Cope with Climate Change and Adverse Events

Knowledge Showcases

 

Completion-Report-VIAA-Workshop-smallTwelve technical officers and two executives from the focal Climate Change offices of seven Southeast Asian countries completed the workshop on Vulnerability, Impact and Adaptation Assessment (VIAA) for Climate Change: Approaches, Methods and Tools on 10-12 July 2013 at Meliá Hanoi Hotel, Hanoi, Vietnam. The officials and technical staff come from Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam and belong to the Southeast Asian Network of Climate Change Offices (SEAN-CC) of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).

Read more: Workshop on Vulnerability, Impact and Adaptation Assessment for Climate Change: Approaches,...

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 6 No. 1 | Remelyn I. de Ramos2

ADNCCA 2015 6 1 DeRamos FINAL resizedThe tool for understanding resilience of fisheries (VA-TURF) is a practical and cost-effective tool for assessing the climate change vulnerability of coastal fisheries in the tropics (Mamauag, Aliño, Martinez, Muallil, Doctor, Dizon, Geronimo, Panga, and Cabral 2013). Developed by local marine scientists at the Marine Science Institute of the University of the Philippines Diliman, VA-TURF aims to identify vulnerable fishing communities and demonstrates how to link vulnerability assessment results to climate change adaptation. The results are inputs to drafting of action plans towards reducing vulnerability.

Read more: Assessing Vulnerability of Coastal Fisheries in the Philippines to Climate Change Impacts: Tool...

Knowledge Showcases

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