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Policy Briefs

Policy Briefs

SEARCA’s Policy Brief Series discusses a comprehensive analysis of climate change-related issues and provides policy and research recommendations towards sustainable agriculture and natural resource management.

POLICY BRIEF SERIES | 2011-2
By Victor B. Ella, PhD

The threats of climate change could adversely affect groundwater resources. In the Philippines - whose population relies heavily on groundwater resources for domestic, agricultural, industrial and other uses - it is important to quantitatively determine the potential effects of climate change on these resources to serve as a basis for sustainable groundwater management. Advanced computer simulation techniques, such as the numerical groundwater model, are yet to be fully utilized in analyzing and predicting the effects of climate change on groundwater the Philippines.

With this in mind, a research supported by SEARCA’s Seed Fund For Research and Training (SFRT) was implemented to explore the use of a numerical groundwater model to simulate and predict the effects of climate change on groundwater levels in a selected productive shallow aquifer system in the Philippines.   The study aimed to determine the hydraulic effects of climate change on groundwater resources and consequently, recommend appropriate policy directions. It also intended to provide basis for possible up-scaling on a regional and national level.

Read more: Simulating the Hydraulic Effects of Climate Change on Groundwater Resources Using a Numerical...

Knowledge Showcases

POLICY BRIEF SERIES | 2010-7
By Digna O. Manzanilla and David E. Johnson

Nearly 100 million rice farmers live in unfavorable rice environments. These communities are among the poorest and most vulnerable to climate change. Solutions are urgently needed to avoid some of the worst impacts of climate change.

At a Consortium for Unfavorable Rice Environments (CURE) workshop held in Cambodia in May 2010, with the theme: Responding to changing climate in the unfavorable rice environments, climate specialist Kay Sumfleth outlined some of the expected impacts of climate change. Climate modelers suggest that year-to-year variability will increase and extreme events will be more frequent. There are great uncertainties over regional differences and the expected impacts of climate change on rice agro-ecosystems. Amid these uncertainties, however, farmers in unfavorable areas are already facing many of the constraints that are expected with climate change. Solutions being developed with farmers in “today’s” unfavorable environments, therefore, will serve rural people in other areas likely to be affected in “tomorrow’s” world.

Read more: Developing “Climate-ready” rice to safeguard livelihoods in the fragile ecosystems

Knowledge Showcases

POLICY BRIEF SERIES | 2010-6
By Agnes C. Rola and Asa Jose U. Sajise

As population increases and as lowland farm lands are rapidly being diverted to alternative uses, the uplands will have an increasing role in securing food. But, without appropriate soil conservation techniques, upland soils become prone to erosion and could eventually become infertile as production intensifies leading to unsustainable production.

However, conservation agriculture (e.g., no-till technology, grass strips plus ridge tillage, alley cropping, contour hedgerows), which is known to effectively reduce soil erosion, has not been widely adopted by farmers. A recent study by Rola, et al. (2009) tried to answer two issues related to the use of conservation technologies for upland corn farmers, namely: 1) Why do corn farmers adopt conservation agriculture technologies and what induces them to adopt; and 2) Do conservation technologies increase production levels and make households less vulnerable to weather disturbances?

Read more: Food Security under Climate Risk: Conservation Farming and Upland Corn in the Philippines

Knowledge Showcases

POLICY BRIEF SERIES | 2009-8
By Akihiro Sawa

The fifteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change closed with broad agreement on the Copenhagen Accord.

What is its significance and what are its implications for the future?

COP 15 Agenda

The biggest agenda of COP15 was to decide on a post-Kyoto protocol Framework within which the world would address climate change beyond 2012. The world’s attention had been focused on whether or not the meeting would succeed in establishing a framework that would impose legally binding emission reductions, in particular, upon the US, the developing countries, China, India, and other newly emerging economies experiencing remarkably rapid growth. Earlier, however, the US explicitly announced that it had no intention to return to the Kyoto Protocol.

The worst scenario for Japan would have been a decision on both a new framework involving the US and China and the extension of the Kyoto Protocol, therefore, perpetuating the disparity of obligation levels between Japan and other countries including the US. We can give the governmen credit for its diplomatic efforts to successfully avoid pushing Japan into such dire straits.

Read more: Japan’s Agenda after COP15: Forget Numerical Targets, Give the World a Framework

Knowledge Showcases

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