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Other Publications

Other Publications

SEARCA and its partner's publications related to climate change come in the forms of books, monographs, and discussion papers.

International Conference on CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION FOR FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY | Conference Summary Report | January 2013

About 150 researchers, academicians, policymakers, and development workers representing 21 countries attended the International Conference on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation for Food and Environmental Security (ICCCIAFES) held on 21–22 November 2012 at the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA) in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. 

Read more: International Conference on CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION FOR FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL...

Knowledge Showcases

Moving Forward: Southeast Asian Perspectives on Climate Change and Biodiversity
FOR SALE

Edited by:
Percy E. Sajise,
Mariliza V. Ticsay,
Gil C. Saguiguit, Jr.

Price: 
Soft Bound: P 650 ($ 14.90)
Hard Bound: P1,300 ($ 29.90)
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Climate change is a global phenomenon that is being experienced by all levels of society, regardless of race and species, and in all types of ecosystems, regardless of geographic location. It will have diverse effects on biodiversity, which will directly impact on food security, water supply and livelihood among others, especially for the poor and more vulnerable sectors of human society. More importantly, all forms of life including human society are trying their best to adapt and survive.

Read more: Moving Forward: Southeast Asian Perspectives on Climate Change and Biodiversity

Knowledge Showcases

GIS-aided Biophysical Characterization of Southern Leyte Landscape in Relation to Landslide Occurrences
By Beatriz C. Jadina

This study was conducted in Southern Leyte to characterize its biophysical attributes, identify factors influencing landslide occurrences, develop a landslide database, and present recommendations for suitable land use. The major attributes of the province that were mapped using geospatial technologies (geographic information system, global positioning system, and remote sensing) were rock formations and fault lines, seismic occurrences, slope characteristics, elevation, soil series, vegetation/land use, and rainfall characteristics. Some soil properties of the landslide areas were also determined.

The highest frequency (21%) of landslide occurrences in Southern Leyte was observed in Miocene–andesitic, basaltic, dacitic flows, and breccia geologic formation which is associated with the Leyte segment of the Philippine Fault. It occurred at angles greater than 18° and was at the highest frequency (54%) at angles greater than 50° in both concave and convex slope curvatures.

Forest cover in Southern Leyte decreased from 53 percent in 1954 to 38 percent in 1992—a 15 percent drop in almost four decades. This further decreased to 14 percent in 2010, a 24 percent decline in approximately two decades since 1992. Current vegetation is dominated by cultivated crops, coconut, and abaca. The province is mapped as slightly suitable (36%) to moderately suitable (51%), to suitable (13%) for coconut and abaca production. Slightly suitable areas are those found at higher elevation (> 600 meters above sea level) and steep slopes (> 50°), while those suitable are found at lower elevations and gentle slopes.

Read more: GIS-aided Biophysical Characterization of Southern Leyte Landscape in Relation to Landslide...

Knowledge Showcases

Impacts of Cyclone Nargis on Livelihood, Food Security and the Agriculture Sector in Myanmar
By Khin Oo and Theingi Myint

Nowadays, international and regional institutions dedicated to research, training, and extension activities in disaster-prone
countries are emerging. Many contemporary approaches to risk management and reduction, now being discussed and advocated at the international level, have grown out of disaster reduction research and application by developing country researchers and institutions. Natural catastrophes and disasters destroy fixed assets and physical capitals, interrupt production and trade, and divert and deplete savings as well as public and private investments. More than the damage to a country’s economy, the proportion of the land area exposed to a hazard determines the severity of a disaster risk.

Read more: Impacts of Cyclone Nargis on Livelihood, Food Security and the Agriculture Sector in Myanmar

Knowledge Showcases

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