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Adaptation Notes

Adaptation Notes

The Agriculture and Development Notes – Climate Change Adaptation (ADN-CCA) Series showcases climate change related efforts and mechanisms in Southeast Asian countries in agriculture and rural development.

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 5 No. 2 | Roberto Pedro C. Sandoval, Jr.and Hideki Kanamaru3

Though people have already adopted measures to limit the negative effects of climate change, more extensive adaptation is required to reduce vulnerability to climate change. Hence, it is important to assess climate impact and vulnerability as well as the adaptation options employed to increase resilience.

There are generally two types of assessment that can be used to support climate change adaptation:

Read more: Approaches to Assessment of Impacts and Vulnerability to Climate Change and Adaptation Options

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 5 No. 1 | Mozaharul Alam2

Climate change poses a risk to the development and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It affects livelihoods, health, and economic development.

Since climate change has become more of a development issue, there is a need to mainstream climate change adaptation (CCA) into national planning as part of broader policies for development. Development planning should take into account anticipated impacts of climate change particularly on the livelihoods, resilience, and health of the population in poor countries.

Read more: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation into Development Planning

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 3 No. 6

Despite the numerous efforts initiated by the government and nongovernmental organizations in addressing climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction management, the Philippines still remains one of the riskiest places in the world. This is because the country lacks the capacity to cope and adapt to natural hazards, particularly to the threats posed by climate change. The Philippines then needs to implement climate-smart disaster risk management plans and initiatives in order to address the future risks posed by climate change.

In its World Risk Index, the UN World Risk Report cited the Philippines as one of the riskiest places out of the 173 countries in the world, ranking third next to the small island nations of Vanuatu and Tonga. The ranking was not only due to the Philippines’ geography and location that makes it prone to natural calamities, but due to its vulnerability to disasters as measured by the presence/lack of public infrastructure, medical services, prevailing nutritional situation, governance, level of education, and availability of insurance.

Read more: Climate-smart Disaster Risk Management in the Philippines

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation1
Vol. 3 No. 5 | By John M. Pulhin2

The warming of the climate system is unequivocal. It is with this characteristic that recent climate-related disasters, including natural hazards, global temperature rise, and extreme weather events, among many, cemented the need for implementing climate change adaptation (CCA) in the Southeast Asian region. The capacity of Southeast Asians to adapt determines the resilience of the region to cope with the current and future changes in climate. Moreover, adaptation reduces the detrimental effects of climate change, while capitalizing on opportunities and beneficial potential impacts that will diminish the vulnerability of the agriculture sector in the region. However, CCA mechanisms in agriculture, in order to maximize its effectiveness, must be mainstreamed into national and local policies highlighting the importance of integration between policy makers, researchers, and the champions of farming and fishing communities.

Southeast Asia is widely considered as one of the world’s most vulnerable regions to climate change. This is caused, among others, by the region’s heavy reliance on agriculture—one of the sectors that requires particular attention in adaptation—for providing livelihoods, especially for those at or below the poverty lines. Hence, agriculture accounts for 11 percent of GDP in 2006 and 43.3 percent of employment in 2004 in Southeast Asia (ADB 2009).

Read more: Mainstreaming Climate Change Adaptation in the Agriculture Sector in Southeast Asia: Challenges...

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