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Adaptation Notes

Adaptation Notes

The Agriculture and Development Notes – Climate Change Adaptation (ADN-CCA) Series showcases climate change related efforts and mechanisms in Southeast Asian countries in agriculture and rural development.

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol 1. No. 5 | By Felino P. Lansigan, Gernot Laganda, Reiner Wassman, and Anan Polthanee | 2012

Climate change is a global problem that affects all areas of human life. Both natural processes, like volcanic eruptions, and anthropogenic activities, such as population increase and industrialization, cause climate change. Furthermore, climate change has impacts on agriculture, forestry, public health, and other systems, and these effects vary across different places in the world.  

Adaptation and mitigation measures are necessary to reduce the risks brought about by climate change. While adaptation considers future risks and seeks to prepare the society and the other systems to the impacts of climate change, mitigation aims to keep climate change below the dangerous level.  

Read more: A Systems Approach to Reducing Risks in Rice Production in Southeast Asia

Knowledge Showcases

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol 1. No. 6 | By Mozaharul Alam, Louis Lebel, Lucille Elna de Guzman, and Oscar Zamora | 2012

Southeast Asia relies heavily on its agricultural capacity, species diversity, and natural resources. However, with the whole region experiencing the impacts of climate change, the need to identify strategic roles for climate change adaptation and mitigation in Southeast Asia rises. Therefore, initiatives, policies, and new technologies are needed to help different countries in the region manage the effects of climate change. The challenge is in contextualizing and localizing international policies in designing and implementing projects on climate change adaptation and mitigation. Small communities should realize the need to contextualize such initiatives to fit their own needs and capacities.  

Read more: Community-based Adaptation to Climate Change in Southeast Asia

Knowledge Showcases

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol 2. No. 1 | By Joey Sarte Salceda1 | 2012

Albay, Philippines is a province located along the eastern coast of the country, facing the Philippine Sea and the Pacific Ocean. With a land area of 2, 552 square kilometres, it is considered the second largest in the Bicol Region.  

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Aside from being the second largest province in the region, Albay is also known as the “Vatican of Disasters” of the Philippines. Various natural phenomena such as typhoons, landslides, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis have plagued the area. As a result, the people of Albay have been vulnerable to persistent poverty, low economic income, and climatic and geological hazards.  

Read more: Adapting to Climate Change: Strategies of Albay, Philippines

Knowledge Showcases

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Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol. 2 No. 2 | By Ronaldo Golez1 | Dumangas, Ilo-ilo2 | 2012

Dumangas, Iloilo is a coastal town located in the island of Panay, Visayas, Philippines with most of its area devoted to agriculture and fisheries. However, the town experiences two extreme conditions: drought during the dry season, and flooding during the rainy season—where for the latter, 65% of the total area of Dumangas is usually inundated. Consequently, farmers experience difficulty in monitoring and maintaining their crops.  

As the local government’s initial step to help the farmers adjust to the adverse impacts of climate change, the municipal government of Dumangas started the Climate Field School (CFS) Program in 2007. The CFS Program was first launched and applied in Indramayu, Indonesia. The Municipality of Dumangas is the first in the Philippines, and second in Asia, to adopt this program. Aside from being able to help the farmers increase farm production, the CFS program enhances the farmers’ adaptive capacity, while addressing poverty and reducing vulnerability and their causes.  

In 2008, Dumangas had a significant increase in rice production. It even surpassed the municipality of Pototan, Iloilo—the biggest rice producer in Western Visayas. In 2011, Dumangas continued to be one of the dominant rice producers. The municipality and the farmers saw this success as a result of the CFS program. CFS enabled them to monitor the changing weather and adjust their farming practices. Hence, they were able to maintain good quality agricultural products despite the continuous threats posted by climate change.

 

Read more: Climate Field School: An Innovative Approach to Agricultural Adaptation

Knowledge Showcases

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