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Adaptation Notes

Adaptation Notes

The Agriculture and Development Notes – Climate Change Adaptation (ADN-CCA) Series showcases climate change related efforts and mechanisms in Southeast Asian countries in agriculture and rural development.

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol. 3 No. 2 | By Roberto Sandoval, Jr. and Stephan Baas | 2013

The manifestations of climate change are now felt by many, especially by upland farmers whose agricultural production is vulnerable to the increasingly unpredictable weather conditions. Although the local communities in the Cordillera region have been able to maintain a sustainable relationship with the resources through their indigenous knowledge and practices, climate change has severely affected the region’s agriculture sector. As such, climate change adaptation (CCA) measures in agriculture were developed in Benguet and Ifugao provinces in the Cordillera. Using the participatory action research approach, local stakeholders were capacitated as they were able to identify and enhance their own sustainable agricultural practices and combine these with knowledge-based technologies that are adaptive to climate change. Accordingly, expanding and mainstreaming these CCA agricultural measures would help improve the capacity of the country’s farmers in facing the threats of climate change.

Read more: Adapting to Climate Change: The Cordillera Experience

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol. 3 No. 1 | By Antonio G.M. La Viña | 2013

In the face of the threats posed by climate change, initiatives for the conservation of natural resources are now being prioritized globally, particularly the conservation of watersheds and forests to reduce carbon emissions. REDD+ (Reducing Emissions, Deforestation, and Forest Degradation and the Conservation of Existing Carbon Stocks) is now gaining ground as a sound mechanism to address climate change. However, countries need to mainstream and adequately implement the social, governance, and environmental safeguards of REDD+ for the mechanism to succeed. Likewise, the issue of carbon property rights needs to be clarified to ensure that the rights of the primary duty bearers of forest and watershed management are recognized.

Humanity is now approaching a “state-shift” in the Earth’s biosphere—a tipping point in the global ecological system—primarily caused by the human-induced climate change. As the detrimental effects and the causes of climate change become apparent, initiatives for the conservation of natural resources have become a global priority, particularly the conservation of watersheds and forests to lessen the anthropogenic carbon emissions.

Read more: REDD+ for Climate Change: Ensuring the Rights of Local Communities

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol 2. No. 6 | By Rex Victor O. Cruz | 2013

Watersheds are critical to economic development and environmental protection in Southeast Asia. Thus, managing them effectively is a key in the pursuit toward sustainable development. Watershed management, however, is a complex decision-making process. The threat brought by climate change further puts stress on the already-stressed watersheds in the region, and would further complicate the already-complex process of watershed management and governance. Extensive research is therefore needed to provide an empirical database that will predict the future changes in watersheds. An integrated watershed management framework must also be developed to synchronize the development of all land and water uses. The roles of multiple stakeholders involved in watershed management and governance should be harmonized in order to achieve effective watershed management and governance in a changing climate.

Read more: Watershed Management and Governance in a Changing Climate

Knowledge Showcases

Agriculture and Development Notes on Climate Change Adaptation
Vol 2. No. 5 | By Auke Idzenga | 2013

adn2013-2-6Anangue is an upland village located in Murcia, Negros Occidental, Philippines. The primary livelihood in the village is farming. However, the villagers experience low agricultural productivity due to the lack of access to sufficient water.

The nearest source of water in the village is a freshwater spring located 240 meters away and elevated by 80 meters. Thus, the community greatly depends on rainfall for domestic consumption and agricultural production. However, with the onset of climate change causing variations in the rainfall pattern and distribution, access to water became more difficult and costly.

To respond to the challenges of agricultural areas like Anangue, the Negros-based organization Alternative Indigenous Development Foundation, Inc. (AIDFI) was established. AIDFI aims to address water problems including those faced by small-scale farmers using various adaptation technologies such as its hydraulic ram pump.

Read more: Hydraulic Ram Pump: A Practical Solution to Climate Change

Knowledge Showcases

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